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Heart Disease | Flower Power Beats High Blood Pressure

Flower Power Beats High Blood Pressure

Drinking a tea made from hibiscus flowers may help lower blood pressure, adding another tool to the chest of natural treatments for this common and serious condition.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. A blood pressure reading of more than 140/90 is considered high, while pre-hypertension ranges from 120/80 through 139/89. Systolic blood pressure—the number on top—is considered the most accurate for diagnosing hypertension.

Plant power protects heart health

Polyphenols are plant compounds well known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These substances are credited with the cholesterol- and blood pressure–lowering effects seen in test tube studies using hibiscus flowers. Investigators from Tufts University aimed to determine if hibiscus tea might also lower blood pressure in people with pre- or mild hypertension.

Sixty-five people between ages 30 and 70 took part in the study, which was published in the Journal of Nutrition. They were given either 3 cups of hibiscus tea per day (containing a total of 3.75 grams of hibiscus flowers) or a hibiscus-flavored placebo drink for six weeks. Blood pressure measurements were taken at the beginning (baseline) and end of the study period.

After six weeks, systolic blood pressure in people drinking the hibiscus tea was significantly reduced. Compared with the baseline measurements, hibiscus tea lowered systolic blood pressure by 5.5% (almost 6 points), whereas no reduction was seen in the placebo group. Reducing blood pressure by this amount could lead to a 14% reduction in death from stroke and a 9% reduction in death from heart disease in the population at large.

“Adding hibiscus tea to each meal is simple and may be an effective strategy for controlling blood pressure among pre- and mildly hypertensive adults,” said the study’s authors. The blood pressure reduction seen in this study was comparable to that achieved with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) protocol, which recommends large amounts of fruits and vegetables, as well as nuts and low-fat dairy products. For many people, following complex dietary guidelines may prove difficult, but adding a few cups of tea to the daily routine might be more doable.

Lower your blood pressure naturally

• Get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Exercise can lower blood pressure, help with weight loss, raise heart-healthy HDL-cholesterol levels, and improve insulin sensitivity, all of which lower your risk for heart disease.

  • Eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes. Unprocessed foods are key to keeping your blood pressure in check.


  • Don’t smoke. Smoking directly increases blood pressure and can lead to a host of other diseases including heart disease and many cancers.


  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing even a few pounds can help lower blood pressure by several points and decrease other risk factors for heart disease.


  • Drink hibiscus tea. Try replacing sugary beverages or coffee with a few cups of this tasty tea each day.

(J Nutr 2010;140:298–303)

February 18, 2010

Kimberly Beauchamp, ND, earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island and her Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from Bastyr University in Kenmore, WA. She cofounded South County Naturopaths in Wakefield, RI, and now sees patients in East Greenwich and Wakefield. Inspired by her passion for healthful eating and her own young daughters, Dr. Beauchamp is currently writing a book about optimizing children’s health through better nutrition.

Copyright © 2010 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of the Aisle7 content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Aisle7. Healthnotes Newswire is for educational or informational purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose or provide treatment for any condition. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a healthcare professional. Aisle7 shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Aisle7 and the Aisle7 logo are registered trademarks of Aisle7.

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The health information contained in this site is not intended as medical advice and should not be considered a substitute for appropriate medical care. Any products mentioned in studies cited in Healthnotes articles are not necessarily endorsed by Bastyr. As with any product, consult with a natural health practitioner to discuss what may be best for you.

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